Showing Off Spencer-Discovering Spencer, the Brookfields, Worcester County, Massachusetts and New England: February 2011

Reading The Tube On A Radon Mitigation System

This is very good useful information.  If you have a radon system check the levels on a regular basis.  My systems sometimes freezes in the winter, on very cold snowy days.  As soon as it warms up it is fine again.  If you are considering purchasing a house with a radon system, take a quick peak at the gauge to make sure the levels are not equal.  Make sure you have a radon test as part of your home inpections.

Reading The Tube On A Radon Mitigation System

I was asked a question about reading a radon system a few days ago, and it gave me the idea for a post. After all, this is National Radon Awareness Month.

Now how about an explanation about radon and how the detectors are SUPPOSED to work, and how the blue fluid is supposed to register...would be very interested to know b/c in my condo on the first floor they put in these things and not one person can tell me if the levels should both be at zero or what...thanks.

 

What The Tube Says

We've all seen the sealed sump pump pits, the big fans, and the pipes... But what about those tubes and the numbers?

Manometers are those u-shaped tubes coming out of the vent pipe, and they contain a liquid (sometimes blue, sometimes red).

 

They do not measure the current level of radon. They measure the current vacuum pressure.

 

So we don't want a "zero" reading... that means the system has no pressure, and the system is down.

 

    This is what you want to see                   This means your system is down

radon working              radon not working

 

Reading Radon

The EPA and equipment manufacturers recommend the testing of radon levels every two years for any house or building that has a radon mitigation system.

Indoor air quality professionals measure radon levels with a continuous radon monitor. These machines can observe spikes or dips in the radon level over a period of time (minimum of 48 hours), and typically include a device that reports if the machine has been removed or tampered with.

There are also passive devices available (inluding charcoal canisters, alpha-track detectors, and charcoal liquid scintillation devices) that are exposed to the air in a home or building for a specific amount of time and are then sent to a laboratory for analysis. These are generally considered to be less reliable than continuous radon monitors, and may be better suited for long-term measuring.

Keep in mind that radon levels in a house or building may change with the season. Homes in summertime, with windows open and the whole house fan running, may have different overall levels than in wintertime when we batten down the hatches.

 

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 Pam Crawford

Pam Crawford, ABR,e-PRO®,CRS,CDPE,LMC

Owner, REALTOR®, Managing Partner, MBA, BSBA
RE/MAX Professional Associates

 

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Comment balloon 1 commentPam Crawford • February 02 2011 07:28AM
Reading The Tube On A Radon Mitigation System
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This is very good useful information. If you have a radon system check the levels on a regular basis. My systems sometimes freezes in the winter, on very cold snowy days. As soon as it warms up it is fine again. If you are considering purchasing… more
What do the letters after your name mean?
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What do the letters after your name mean? I was talking to one of my newest agents the other day and she got me really thinking. She had seen somewhere that I have an MBA, but it is not on my business card. She asked me why? My response was… more